©2018 TOURiSM TASMANiA
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Get out and about and explore Tassie with these picks, guaranteed to brighten your soul and make you feel alive. Try a luxe glamping bell tent on for size, zip down forest trails on a mountain bike, sip gin hand crafted with native botanicals and tee off on King Island.

1. TAKE A GREAT WALK

Now that summer’s here, boot up and make for the great outdoors. If you haven’t taken to the world’s edge and walked the Three Capes Track, this four-day cliff-hugging trek is the ultimate way to welcome in summer. With over 2,000 kilometres of walking trails across the island, there are plenty of shorter walks on offer too. Dip into rainforest on a circumnavigation of Dove Lake or take a short but steep climb to the summit of Cathedral Rock, just out of Hobart. Take our word for it, there are walks, well – everywhere.

Lookout over Three Capes Track

…shake off winter, boot up and make for the great outdoors

Image Credit: Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service

2. HOW TO PUT THE GLAMP IN CAMP

There’s a new way to sleep under the stars. Leave your camping gear behind and snuggle into a comfy bed with fresh linen and warm blankets. There’s a glamping spot for every luxe camper in Tassie. Discover luxury vintage bell tents dotted along the Tamar River and at the Bay of Fires, tipis tucked away in secluded habitat reserves, safari tents in the Derwent Valley, and a rustic beach tree house near Burnie.

Bay of Fires Glamping Tent lit up at night

…there’s a glamping spot for every luxe camper in Tassie

Image Credit: Liza-Jane Sowden

3. SIP GIN FIT FOR A QUEEN

If it’s good enough for the Queen of England who are we to judge? We think the Queen would be tickled pink to hear of our distillers trudging about in wild fields to handpick rare native botanicals. Southern Wild Distillery even goes a step further collecting water from two wild rivers. Grandvewe Cheeses craft their gin from Sheep’s Whey adding no less than six Australian native botanicals, three never used before in gin making. Turn distiller for a day at McHenry Distillery. BYO botanicals or pick from those on offer as you whip up your signature gin and take the finished bottle away with you.

4. JOIN THE TRAIL REVIVAL

If you’ve heard about Tassie’s recent rise to become a mountain biking mecca, the first place you’ll want to travel to is a little town called Derby. Didn’t bring your bike? No drama, just head out on the Blue Derby Pods ride – a three-day, soft-adventure mountain biking experience based from your private accommodation – a pod nestled amidst the trails. Rough it on the tracks by day and indulge by night with local produce prepared by your guides paired with Tassie’s best wines and craft beers.

Mountain biking across creek on a Blue Derby Pods ride

…rough it on the tracks by day and indulge by night with local produce prepared by your guides

Image Credit: Flow Mountain Bike

5. TEE OFF

If you haven’t swung a club on King Island, you’d best book your tee time. Ocean Dunes and Cape Wickham Links have already been described world-class. Rugged, windswept coastlines present a challenge well followed up with prime King Island beef. Back on mainland Tasmania, there’s good reason international golf enthusiasts drop into Barnbougle Dunes by chopper. Haven’t played a round at neighbouring Lost Farm? Add that to your list too.

Golf course on King Island coast

…rugged, windswept coastlines

Image Credit: Gary Lisbon

6. WANDER FARMER’S MARKETS

There’s a flurry of farmer’s markets across Tasmania. Some are more well-known than others – the likes of Hobart’s Farm Gate Market, Launceston’s Harvest Market and the organic veggie vendors of Salamanca Market. But there are so many more, from Cygnet to Brighton to Wynyard. If you like the idea of your rhubarb so fresh it was plucked from the earth that morning, or organic walnuts collected from trees over a century old, take your time at a local market.

7. HOP ISLANDS

Just because you’re on an island, doesn’t mean it’s the only one to visit. In fact, the Tasmanian archipelago is made up of 334 islands, so there’s plenty of options. If you haven’t popped over to Flinders Island that’s a must. Take your bikes and go on the cargo ship, or nip across with Sharp Airlines. There’s a famous wombat lady to meet, turquoise waters, unreal fishing and secret coves. For those based in Hobart and surrounds, Bruny Island and Maria Island are great island hopping options too.

Ocean view from rocks on Maria Island

…turquoise waters, unreal fishing and secret coves

Image Credit: Stu Gibson

11.DIAL UP ADVENTURES

There are few places in Australia that one can go canyoning, and only one place in the world that has Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park as its canyoning playground. Those with a penchant for rafting might be tempted by the mighty Franklin and mountain bike devotees will love the trails of Derby in Tasmania’s north east.

Canyoning in Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park

…those with a penchant for rafting might be tempted by the mighty Franklin

Image Credit: Tourism Australia and Graham Freeman

9. WALK A DESERTED BEACH

Take the Great Eastern Drive and find yourself a beach of your own. That’s the beauty of Tasmania. No need to battle over umbrella space. If there’s footprints or humans in sight, keep walking. Step on round to the next cove or drive up around the point, a deserted sandy spot is never far away. Keep a look out for Cosy Corner, and do your best to keep it a secret.

Exploring Cosy Corner beach at the Bay of Fires along the Great Eastern Drive

…if there’s footprints or humans in sight, keep walking

Image Credit: Rob Burnett

10. SEE GALLERIES BY BIKE

Why arrive to a gallery by vehicle when you can pedal up to the door? The subversive wonderland that is Mona encourages all manner of cyclists to arrive by pedal power. Follow the river-side track from the city, setting aside time to explore GASP (Glenorchy Arts and Sculpture Park) by the foreshore en route. Or pick up an Artbike from the eastern shore and busy yourself with self-exploration of local galleries including TMAG (Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery), Handmark Gallery, Colville Gallery and more.

Closeup of an ARTBIKE at Hobart's waterfront

…the subversive wonderland that is Mona encourages all manner of cyclists to arrive by pedal power

Image Credit: Nic Goodwolf

Banner Credit: Scott Sporleder, Matador

Heidi Laugesen

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