Samuel Shelley
Samuel Shelley
Travel Tip

6 ways to feed your inner oyster lover

Kathryn Leahy
It’s an experience that’s hard to replicate – oysters fresh from the ocean, shucked while you wait. In fact, it’s so impressive that Lonely Planet recently ranked Tassie’s oysters at #13 on the world’s top food experiences. So it’s official: here’s where to find the world’s best oysters!

1. For the oyster addict

When you’re on the east coast the obvious thing to do is eat oysters straight from the ocean. Get an exclusive look behind-the-scenes of Freycinet Marine Farm in Coles Bay and learn what goes into farming oysters. With the tour over, the logical next step is to eat – sit down to a seafood feast of mussels, rock lobster and abalone.

Getting oysters from the farm at Freycinet Marine Farm
Adrian Cook
Freycinet Marine Farm

2. For the oyster shucking rookie

Be first to line up at the Melshell Oyster Shack when it reopens this spring. After a brief winter break, the bright blue caravan, just north of Swansea, will be serving again from 3 September. Sit on the river bank at Moulting Lagoon, enjoy premium natural oysters and learn everything there is to know about growing them.

A man on a stool eating fresh oysters sitting next to a pile of discarded oyster shells at Melshell Oyster Farm Gate
Rob Burnett
Melshell Oysters Farm Gate

3. For the bar fly

Get Shucked on Bruny Island pluck their oysters fresh each morning, from waters that flow straight from the Southern Ocean. This is serious oyster growing territory worthy of a visit. Prop yourself up at the bar and ask for a Bloody Mary oyster shooter – a splash of 666 Tassie vodka with your just-shucked oyster will pay tribute nicely. They also have what may be Australia’s only oyster drive-thru – if you prefer your shellfish on the run.

freshly shucked oysters with a lemon at Get Shucked Oysters on Bruny Island
Tourism Australia & Samuel Shelley
Freshly shucked oysters

4. For those who like it wild

If it’s the call of the wild you’re after, forget those hatchery-raised morsels, you want a natural-set oyster that survived the one-in-a-million journey from egg to adult. The humble shed at Lease 65 might not look like much but it’s your ticket to fresh, briny buttery oysters pulled straight from Moulting Bay. The area is famous for its salty water so expect fat, juicy oysters with great flavour.

woman and man sitting on jetty eating oysters and drinking wine
Samuel Shelley
Nice spot for lunch

5. Matches made in heaven

Looking for something cool and fresh to go with those oysters? Most turn to bubbles. They provide the magic, textural contrast to smooth velvety oysters. How convenient that there’s an abundance of wineries, many within a stone’s throw from Tassie’s oyster farms.

a man eating oysters with two glasses of sparkling wine next to him at Bangor Vineyard Shed
Rob Burnett
Bangor Vineyard Shed

Of course that’s not to say you should overlook a brew – you might discover something special when oysters and Tasmania craft beer get together. There’s a theme emerging in Tassie of brews infused with tastes of the sea. Barilla Bay boils up oysters with black malts to produce a unique stout called Dark Isle Barilla Bay Oyster Stout, and Two Metre Tall brew a Salty Sea Stout with mussels, oysters, seawater and seaweed. Bottoms up.

6. For your first and last port of call

Bring on the tangiest oysters imaginable. Large Pacific oysters have intense flavours and Barilla Bay Oysters aren’t about to shy away. The Barilla Bay Oyster Farm is just two minutes from the airport, so make it your first port of call when you arrive and your last before you depart. They’ll even have your oysters packed to take with you on the plane so you can savour your Tassie oyster adventure for that little bit longer.

fresh oysters ready to eat
Rob Burnett
A dozen of the best

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